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University of Cambridge
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE
Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study

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Below you will find information about forthcoming, recent and past events in which PADS+ have taken or will take part. Follow the links to find out more!

 

Forthcoming events

American Society of Criminology Conference
16th-19th November 2011, Washington, D.C, USA.

Recent events

2011 Conference on evidence-based policing
05th July 2011, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, UK

Stockholm Criminology Symposium

13th-15th June 2011, Stockholm, Sweden.

Fourth Conference of the European Network of Analytical Sociologists
09th-10th June 2011, University of Paris IV - Sorbonne, France.

Home Office Crime and Justice Statistics Network 2011 Annual Conference
1st June 2011, Home Office, London.

Meeting of the Neighborhoods & Crime Research Working Group
2nd-6th April 2011, National Institute of Justice, Washington DC.

3rd Conference of the Flemish Society of Criminology:
How invariant is the interaction of propensity and exposure to criminogenic moral settings in the explanation
of offending?  A study in sub groups by gender and immigrant background in two different urban settings.
11th February 2011, Brussels, Belgium.

Public lecture: Causes of crime and crime prevention
14th December 2010, University of Orebro, Sweden

American Society of Criminology Conference
17th-20th November 2010, San Francisco, California, USA.

Seminar for A-Level Psychology Students
October 2010, Highfields School, Hertfordshire, UK.

Workshop on social mechanisms and social structure
23rd-26th September 2010, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Uppsala, Sweden.

2010 European Society of Criminology Conference
08th-11th September 2010, Liege, Belgium.

Public lecture: What drives persistent criminality?
07th July 2010, University of Munster, Germany.

Conference on "Security Matters": The situational dynamics of crime: Towards a true ecology of urban crime.
20th-21st May 2010, Royal College of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.

Seminar: Explaining crime as moral action
13th May 2010, All Souls College, Oxford University, UK.

Guest lectures: Lecture series on Crime and its explanation
January and March 2010, Malmo University, Sweden.

2009 American Society of Criminology Conference
04th-07th November 2009, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Festival of Ideas
23rd October 2009, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, UK.

Seminar for A-Level Psychology Students
30th September 2009, Highfields School, Hertfordshire, UK.

Institute of Criminology Alumni weekend
25th-26th September 2009, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, UK.

50th Anniversary of the University of Cambridge Institute of Criminology Conference, UK
24th September 2009, University of Cambridge Faculty of Law, UK.

2009 European Society of Criminology Conference
09th-12th September 2009, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Stockholm Criminology Symposium
22nd-24th June 2009, Stockholm, Sweden.

Guest lecture: Crime prevention
3rd April 2009, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.

Guest lecture: Lecture series on Crime and its explanation
March 2009, Malmo University, Sweden.

Guest Lecture: The causes and prevention of young people's crimes
18th March 2009, Local Crime Prevention Council in Helsingborg, Sweden.

Guest Lecture and workshop: Youth Crime: Its causes and prevention (Ungdomsbrott – orsaker och hur man förebygger). 17th February 2009, City of Stockholm Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm, Sweden.

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PADS+ Events

 

Guest Lectures


Causes of crime and crime prevention

PADS+ Principal Investigator Professor Wikström gave a public lecture on Causes of crime and crime prevention on 14th December 2010 at the University of Orebro, Sweden.

What drives persistent criminality?

PADS+ Principal Investigator Professor Wikström gave a public lecture on What drives persistent criminality? on 07th July 2010 at the University of Munster, Germany.

Explaining Crime as Moral Action

PADS+ Principal Investigator Professor Wikström gave a seminar on Explaining crime as moral action on 13th May 2010 at All Souls College, Oxford University, UK.

The explanation of crime

PADS+ Principal Investigator Professor Wikström and Research Associate Kyle Treiber respectively gave a lecture on Crime and its explanation in January and March 2010 at the University of Malmo (Sweden), covering topics such as action theory, morality and self-control, individual and environment interactions, and stability and change in crime involvement.

Seminar for A-level Psychology Students

PADS+ Research Associate Kyle Treiber travelled to Highfields School in Letchworth, Hertfordshire, on 30th September 2009 to speak to A-Level Psychology students about PADS+ and social disadvantage. Kyle returned to the school in October 2010.

Crime prevention

Principal Investigator Professor Per-Olof Wikström gave a lecture on crime prevention on 3rd April 2009, as a guest lecturer at the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.

The explanation of crime

PADS+ Research Associate Kyle Treiber gave a lecture on the roles of psychobiology, self-control and change and stability in the explanation of crime in March 2009 at the University of Malmo, Sweden.

The causes and prevention of young people's crimes

Principal Investigator Professor Per-Olof Wikström gave a lecture entitled The causes and prevention of young people's crimes, on 18th March 2009 at the Local Crime Prevention Council in Helsingborg, Sweden.

Youth Crime: its Causes and Prevention (Ungdomsbrott – orsaker och hur man förebygger)

Principal Investigator Professor Per-Olof Wikström gave a lecture and workshop entitled Youth crime:
Its causes and prevention (Ungdomsbrott – orsaker och hur man förebygger)
on 17th February 2009, organised by the City of Stockholm Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm, Sweden.

Do people Obey the Law Because they Fear the Consequences?

Principal Investigator Professor Per-Olof Wikström gave a lecture entitled Do people obey the law because they fear the consequences? on 18th December 2008, as a guest lecturer at the Universidad Nacional, Madrid, Spain.


Seminar for A-level Psychology Students

PADS+ Research Associate Kyle Treiber travelled to Oundle School in Oundle, Cambridgeshire, on 30th October 2008 to speak to A-Level Psychology students about PADS+ methods and preliminary findings.

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Workshops and day conferences

2011 Conference on evidence-based policing

Professor Wikström presented at the 2011 Conference on evidence-based policing held at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, on 05th July 2011.
http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/events/conferences/ebp/2011/

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Home Office Crime and Justice Statistics Network 2011 Annual Conference


Professor Wikström presented Adolescent criminal careers. Key findings from PADS+. at the Home Office Crime and Justice Statistics Network 2011 Annual Conference, on 1st June 2011, at the Home Office, in London.

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Meeting of the Neighborhoods & Crime Research Working Group

Professor Wikström attended a meeting of the Neighborhoods & Crime Research Working Group at the National Institute of Justice, Washington DC, on 2nd-6th April 2011.

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Workshop on social mechanisms and social structure

Professor Wikström participated in a workshop on social mechanisms and social structure, which took place at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Uppsala, Sweden, on 23rd-26th September 2010.

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Institute of Criminology Festival of Ideas

PADS+ takes part annually in the University of Cambridge's Festival of Ideas, displaying posters describing different aspects of the study, and running a power point presentation pointing out key elements of the methodology, theory and data collection techniques. Additionally, in order to give an insight into PADS+ fieldwork, PADS+ researchers demonstrate how questionnaires and psychometric tests are administered to the PADS+ participants.

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Institute of Criminology Alumni weekend

PADS+ takes part annually in the Institute’s Alumni weekend, presenting posters and slides and making researchers available to discuss PADS+ research with interested attendees.

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50th Anniversary of the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge

This day-conference on 24th September 2009 welcomed back esteemed alumni of the Cambridge Institute of Criminology as well as world-renowned colleagues to celebrate the history and the current work of the Institute. Professor Wikström was one of 17 invited speakers and presented on Why young people commit crime.

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Youth and Crime
Peterborough, 29th February 2008

This conference was highly successful and introduced many key policy makers and practitioners to the study and some of its preliminary findings. Fruitful group discussions brought together perspectives from research, policy and practice and provided insights into how PADS findings may be used to improve public services for young people and, as a consequence, the quality of life and future prospects for young people growing up with individual or environmental disadvantages.

For more information, click here.

Select delegate comments:

‘A wealth of information presented in a short period of time. I would love the opportunity to explore more…’ (Service Development Officer, Peterborough City Council, Children’s Play Services)

‘Immensely enjoyable event. Speaker managed to make a technical subject accessible to lay people. I learned a great deal today’ (Partnership Manager, Educational Provision and Inclusion)

‘Will plan intervention programme differently after today’ (Referral Order Liaison Officer, YOS).

‘Excellent conference – so much ‘food for thought’. I feel very privileged to be working in an area that can so directly benefit from this longitudinal study’ (Assistant Director: Family and Community, Peterborough City Council)

‘Really interesting and challenging stuff’ (Basic Skills Officer, YOS).


Overall, the analyses conducted so far (and the responses received from colleagues) suggest that academics and practitioners alike value the study, its methods and its ability to address the role of the individual-environment interaction in crime causation in new and innovative ways.

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Conferences

Please see our publication pages to see the complete list of conference papers.

Fourth Conference of the European Network of Analytical Sociologists

Professor Wikström presented Why people follow and breach rules of conduct at the Fourth Conference of the European Network of Analytical Sociologists, on 09th-10th June 2011, at the University of Paris IV - Sorbonne, France. (see conference papers)

http://www.gemass.fr/IMG/pdf/ENAS_2011_-_Abstracts.pdf

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3rd Conference of the Flemish Society of Criminology

Professor Lieven Pauwels presented a paper, co-authored by Professor Wikström, entitled “How invariant is the interaction of propensity and exposure to criminogenic moral settings in the explanation of offending? A study in sub groups by gender and immigrant background in two different urban settings, at the 3rd Conference of the Flemish Society of Criminology,  on 11th February 2011 in Brussels. (see conference papers)

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Conference on "Security Matters"

Principal Investigator Professor Wikström was a featured speaker at the Conference on "Security Matters" on 20th-21st May 2010 at The Royal College of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, where he presented the paper The situational dynamics of crime: Towards a true ecology of urban crime (see conference papers).

Further information can be found at: http://www.kth.se/abe/konferenser/secmatters

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Stockholm Criminology Symposium

2011

PADS+ attended the 2011 Stockholm Criminology Symposium, which took place on 13th-15th June 2011.

PADS+ organised a panel entitled Breaking Rules. The Social and Situational Dynamics of Young People's Urban Crime. This panel presented key findings from the first phase (adolescence) of PADS+. The analyses, guided by Situational Action Theory, focused on young people's crime propensity, their exposure to criminogenic settings, and how propensity and exposure interact in explaining crime events.

Professor Wikström presented a paper entitled Young people's social life and crime. Research Associate Kyle Treiber presented The situational dynamics of young people's crime, and Team Manager Beth Hardie concluded the session by presenting Choosing crime as an alternative. (see conference papers)

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2009

Principal Investigator Professor Wikström was a featured speaker at the Stockholm Criminology Symposium on 22nd-24th June 2009, where he spoke on Researchers’ Advice to Policy on Youth Crime. He presented the paper How to create effective methods for preventing young people's crime involvement by using knowledge and evidence. Research Associate Kyle Treiber spoke on moral decision making in the paper Moral choice: habit and deliberation (see conference papers).

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Youth Justice Conference

Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström presented at the Annual Youth Justice Conference on 26th-27th November 2008 in Harrogate. This conference is one of the leading events for those involved in the study and prevention of youth crime, including police, probations and youth offending officials, academics and policy makers, and addresses current issues on the topic of youth crime.

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American Society of Criminology

2011

PADS+ will attend the 2011 American Society of Criminology Conference, which will take place at the Washington Hilton Hotel, in Washington, D.C., on 16th-19th November 2011.

PADS+ have organised 3 panels.
The first panel will discuss the role of choice in crime causation with the point of departure in each of three contemporary criminological theories (Self-control Theory, Routine Activity Theory, and Situational Action Theory).

The second panel will present key findings from the first phase (adolescence) of PADS+. The analyses, guided by Situational Action Theory, focus on young people's crime propensity, their exposure to criminogenic settings, and how propensity and exposure interact in explaining crime events.

The third panel will present papers on various topics testing different aspects and applications of Situational Action Theory. Questions addressed include whether age and sex difference can be explained by differences in peoples crime propensity and criminogenic exposure, the role of moral emotions in crime causation, the causes of radicalisation, and the possibility to apply SAT to victimisation.

The role of choice in crime causation
Michael Gottfredson of the University of California will present Self-control Theory. Marcus Felson of Texas State University will present Routine Activity Theory. PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström will conclude the session by presenting Situational Action Theory.
Robert Sampson from Harvard University will chair this session, while Charles R. Tittle from NC State University will act as discussant.


Breaking rules. The social and situational dynamics of young people's urban crime
PADS+ Affiliated Researcher Dietrich Oberwittler from the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law will present a paper entitled Young people's social life and crime, co-authored by Professor Wikstrom. Research Associate Kyle Treiber will present The situational dynamics of young people's crime, and Team Manager Beth Hardie will conclude the session by presenting Choosing crime as an alternative.
Patricia Brantingham from Simon Fraser University will chair this session, while D. Wayne Osgood from Penn State University will act as discussant.

Testing Situational Action Theory 2. Sex, age, moral emotions, radicalisation and victimisation
NSCR Senior Researchers Frank Weerman and Wim Bernasco, and Affiliated Researcher Lieven Pauwels, of the University of Ghent, will present a paper entitled Crime propensity, activity patterns and the explanation of age and sex differences in delinquency among Dutch youths. PADS+ PhD student, Neema Trivedi, will present An exploration of the role of moral emotions in crime causation: a neuroscience perspective. Noemie Bouhana, from University College London, will present Understanding radicalisation: Individual vulnerability, exposure, emergence. Affiliated Researcher Andromachi Tseloni, of Nottingham Trent University will conclude the session by presenting a paper entitled Do juvenile offenders and victims differ? Testing their association beyond lifestyle and individual risk according to Situational Action Theory.
Ross Homel from Griffith University will chair this panel.

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2010

PADS+ attended the 2010 American Society of Criminology Conference, which took place at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in San Francisco, California, on 17th-20th November 2010.

PADS+ had organised 3 panels, one which compared and contrasted Situational Action Theory with Institutional Anomie Theory, and two which presented research findings.

Situating Situational Action Theory in macro-social context: The role of social institutions addressed the macro-micro problem in crime causation by critically discussing Situational Action Theory (SAT) and Institutional Anomie Theory (IAT) and, on that basis, the potential for integrating theory about situational action and the role of social institutions in crime causation. Robert Sampson from the University of Harvard chaired this session.

PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström critically discussed limitations of Institutional Anomie Theory in a paper entitled Institutional Anomie Theory: Where is the action?, while Richard Rosenfeld of the University of Missouri-St.Louis critically discussed limitations of Situational Action Theory in a paper entitled Situational Action Theory: Where are the social institutions?. Steven Messner from the University at Albany then presented a paper entitled Situational Action and Social Institutions: What are the prospects for theoretical synthesis?, in which he suggested ways of integrating theories of situational action and social institutions.

See conference papers here.

Testing Situational Action Theory I: Propensity, exposure and their interaction presented research that tests some key propositions of the newly developed Situational Action Theory, including findings from PADS+ and comparative studies. The papers presented in this session focussed on the role of crime propensity, criminogenic exposure, and their interaction in crime causation. Professor Friedrich Lösel from the University of Cambridge chaired this session.

PADS+ Affiliated Researcher Dietrich Oberwittler from the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law presented a paper entitled Explaining spatial-temporal concentrations of crime events in the urban area by the space and time convergence of crime prone people and criminogenic setting, which is co-authored by Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström and Research Associate Kyle Treiber.

Dr Oberwittler was joined by PADS+ Affiliated Collaborator Professor Gerben Bruinsma, Director of the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR), who presented a paper entitled Peer pressures and the propensity to offend, which is co-authored by NSCR Senior Researchers Frank Weerman and Wim Bernasco, and Lieven Pauwels of the University of Ghent.

Olena Antonaccio from the University of Miami concluded the session by presenting a paper entitled The independent and interdependent influences of propensity and environmental exposure on acts of crime: A multi-level assessment of Situational Action Theory, which is co-authored by Ekaterina Botchkovar from Northeastern University and Lorine A. Hughe from the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Michael Gottfredson of the University of California acted as discussant.

See all conference papers here.



Testing Situational Action Theory II: The causes of the causes presented research that tests some key propositions of the newly developed Situational Action Theory using data from PADS+. This session focussed particularly on the role of the causes of the causes in crime causation. This session was chaired by Bryan Vila from Washington State University.

PADS+ Research Manager Beth Hardie presented a paper entitled Parental monitoring, young people’s activities and crime involvement, which is co-authored by Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström. Jane Horgan from the University of Cambridge presented Religion, morality and crime, which is co-authored by PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström. Noemie Bouhana from University College London concluded this session by presenting a paper entitled Sex, class and arson.

PADS+ Affiliated Researcher Ralph Taylor from Temple University acted as discussant.

See conference papers here.


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2009

PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström and Research Associate Kyle Treiber attended the 2009 conference, which took place at the Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 04th-07th November 2009.

The need for theory-based criminology brought together distinguished names in criminological theory and research in an effort to promote a more theory-based criminology. Dean Julie Horney of the School of Criminal Justice at the State University of New York at Albany chaired this panel. PADS+ Principle Investigator Per-Olof Wikström presented a paper entitled The importance of asking why and how. Toward an analytical criminology. (see conference papers). He was joined by Michael Gottfredson of the University of California, who presented a paper on Sanctions, temptations, and self-Interest in choice theories of crime, and Robert J. Sampson of Harvard University, who presented a paper entitled Experiments are not the gold standard: Causal knowledge and observational science. Each of these papers addressed a particular common problem related to theory and/or theory testing in criminology, and suggested ways to advance criminological theorising and research. John Hagan of Northwestern University acted as discussant.

This was a dynamic panel which pit some of today’s leading criminological minds against some the most persistent challenges affecting advancement of the discipline. For more information, including abstracts for each paper, click here.

Testing Situational Action Theory: Propensity, exposure and their interaction tested crucial assumptions of Situational Action Theory using data from the longitudinal Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+). Distinguished Professor Frank Cullen of the University of Cincinnati chaired this panel. PADS+ Research Associate Kyle Treiber presented a paper on Person and propensity: Morality and the ability to exercise self-control. (see conference papers). Affiliated researcher Dietrich Oberwittler of the Max Planck Institute in Freiburg presented a paper on Environment and Exposure: The moral context. (see conference papers). Affiliated Researcher Andromachi Tseloni of Nottingham Trent University tied these topics together in a final paper on The interaction between propensity and exposure. Cross-sectionally and developmentally. (see conference papers). Each paper provided support for some main assumptions of Situational Action Theory. Professor Charles Tittle of North Carolina State University acted as discussant.

This was one of the first public presentations of data from the PADS+ study and tied in with two books currently under development, 'Crime as moral action', which will cover the first 5 years of the study, and 'The social dynamics of urban crime', which will cover aspects of the study as well as the Peterborough Community Survey. For more information on this panel, click here.

Individual Papers

PADS+ affiliated researcher Professor Ralph B. Taylor presented a paper co-authored by Principle Investigator Per-Olof Wikström entitled Who goes where, why, and does what, for what reason? Disentangling the influence of settings and selection on the occurrence of crime. (see conference papers). This paper begins to unpack the complicated subject of selection effects. It attempts to differentiate individual, self-selection effect from social selection effects and and discusses the need to recognize that the influences which leads people to take part in certain settings, and the influences which lead them to act in certain ways in those settings are distinct. For the full abstract click here.


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2008

PADS+ researchers are a regular and active presence at the ASC annual meetings. PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström and Research Associate Kyle Treiber attended the 2008 conference, which took place at the Hyatt Regency, St Louis Missouri, on 12th-15th November 2008.

Professor Wikström spoke in Comparative informal neighbourhood social control, a thematic panel on collective efficacy and social control, applying collective efficacy as a measure of environmental risk to an analysis of the interaction between propensity and exposure in crime causation in the paper Propensity and exposure: A study into the social ecology of crime (see conference papers).

Professor Wikström also organised a session entitled Applying Situational Action Theory to some key criminological problems, which was chaired by Professor Robert J. Sampson of Harvard University. This session was dedicated to the application of the Situational Action Theory to three key topics in criminological research: deterrence, persistent offending and terrorism. Professor Friedrich Lösel of the University of Cambridge served as discussant.

-Affiliated Researcher Professor Andromachi Tseloni presented the paper Do people abide by the law because they fear getting caught? (see conference papers), which analysed key deterrence questions using PADS+ data.

-Research Associate Kyle Treiber presented the paper What drives persistent and desistence in offending? (see conference papers), which relates to the chapter What drives persistent offending: The neglected and unexplored role of the social environment (Wikström & Treiber, 2009) now available in The Development of Persistent Criminality, edited by Joanne Savage, from Oxford University Press.

-Affiliated Researcher Noemie Bouhana presented the paper Acts of terrorism as moral action (see conference papers), which relates to Theorising terrorism: Terrorism as moral actions (Bouhana & Wikström, 2008), a research report published by the Jill Dando Institute, University College of London (see conference papers).

PADS+ Affiliated Researcher Professor Ralph Taylor also presented a paper Separating selection effects from social influences: Crippling influences of current cautions (see conference papers) in the panel The influence of social controls, social bonding, social capital and social settings on crime .


For more information on PADS+ researchers' attendance at previous ASC conferences, click here.


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European Society of Criminology

2010

PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström attended the 10th Conference of the European Society of Criminology, which took place in Liege, Belgium, on 08th-11th September 2010.

PADS+ had organised a panel entitled Testing Situational Action Theory. Empirical findings from research in Colombia, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström presented a paper entitled key propositions of Situational Action Theory: A brief overview. Professor Alfonso Serrano-Maíllo of the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) and Principal Investigator of the Madrid Study presented Preliminary findings from a partial test of Situational Action Theory with a sample of youngsters from Cali, Colombia.

Dr. Frank Weerman from the NSCR and Senior Researcher of SPAN (Study of Peers, Activities and Neighbourhoods) presented a paper entitled Core elements of Situational Action Theory: A comparative test in a Dutch and an English city, co-authored by PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström.

Professor Wikström presented Exploring and explaining adolescent crime trajectories, co-authored by Professor Jost Reinecke of the University of Bielefeld (see all conference papers).

Professor Anthony E. Bottoms of the University of Cambridge Institute of Criminology chaired this panel.

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2009

PADS+ researchers attended the 2009 conference, which took place in Ljubljana on 09th-12th September 2009.

PADS+ organised several panels.

The Importance of Action Theory in Criminology brought together distinguished names in criminological theory and research in an effort to promote a more theory-driven, analytical criminology. Dr Treiber of the University of Cambridge Institute of Criminology chaired this panel.

In PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström's absence, Dr Treiber presented a paper entitled The importance of perceptions and choices. Toward an analytical criminology. (see conference papers). She was joined by Michael Gottfredson of the University of California, who presented a paper on Self-interest, sanctions and actions in control theories of crime, and Alfonso Serrano-Maíllo of the Madrid based Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, who presented a paper entitled The role of the causal theory of action in criminological theories. The case of situational action and self-control theory. Each of these papers addressed a particular common problem related to theory and/or theory testing in criminology, and suggested ways to advance criminological theorising and research.

For more information, including abstracts for each paper, click here.

Testing Situational Action Theory tested crucial assumptions of Situational Action Theory using data from the longitudinal Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+). Affiliated researcher Dietrich Oberwittler of the Max Planck Institute in Freiburg chaired this panel. PADS+ Research Associate Kyle Treiber presented a paper on Person and propensity: Morality and the ability to exercise self-control. (see conference papers).
Dietrich Oberwittler
presented a paper on Environment and exposure: The moral context (see conference papers). Affiliated researcher Andromachi Tseloni of Nottingham Trent University tied these topics together in a final paper on The interaction between propensity and exposure. (see conference papers). Each paper provided support for some main assumptions of Situational Action Theory.

This was one of the first public presentations of data from the PADS+ study and tied in with two books currently under development, 'Crime as moral action', which will cover the first 5 years of the study, and 'The social dynamics of urban crime', which will cover aspects of the study as well as the Peterborough Community Survey. For more information on this panel, click here.

Young people’s experience of and involvement in violent crime. Findings from the longitudinal Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+). Young people’s involvement in violent offending and victimization remains a key topic for criminologists, and a key issue for criminal justice practitioners, a fact made all the more evident by the recent rise in knife crimes amongst young people in cities like London. This panel explored trends in young people’s violent crime using data from the first six annual waves of PADS+ (2002-2008). PADS+ Research Associate Kyle Treiber presented a paper on Violence as situational action: A theoretical framework. Research Assistant Harsha Brooks presented Young people’s reported and recorded violence: Trends in longitudinal self-report and official data. Research Manager Beth Hardie presented a paper entitled Is there a place and time for violence? Using a Space-Time Budget to analyze young people’s violent activity patterns and Research Assistant Neema Trivedi presented on Love-hate relationships: An exploration of young people’s self-reported partner violence. (see all conference papers).

This panel built upon the paper Violence as situational action.

For more information on this panel, click here.

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2008

PADS+ researchers annually attend the ESC Annual Meeting, where they present on PADS+ and make contact with many of their European collaborators. PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström and Research Associate Kyle Treiber attended the 2008 conference, which took place in Edinburgh on 2nd-5th September 2008.

Professor Wikström chaired the panel Morality and crime, in which he presented the paper Morality, moral contexts and crime (see conference papers). He also chaired the panel Applying Situational Action Theory to key criminological problems: Deterrence, persistence and terrorism.

In this panel, affiliated researcher Professor Andomachi Tseloni spoke on applications of Situational Action Theory to deterrence in the paper Do people abide by the law because they fear getting caught (see conference papers), which included an empirical analysis of PADS+ data.

Research Associate Kyle Treiber spoke on What drives persistence and desistence in offending (see conference papers) and affiliated researcher Noemie Bouhana spoke on Terrorism as moral action (see conference papers).
Collaborative researcher Professor Alfonso Serrano-Maillo, Principal Investigator of the Madrid Study, served as discussant.

For more information on PADS+ researchers' attendance at previous ESC conferences, click here.


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Second European Network of Research Institutes in Criminology Conference
Crime and the Community

On 26th and 27th April 2008, Dr Kyle Treiber took part in the Second Conference for the European Network of Research Institutes in Criminology, in Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström's absence. The conference hosted a number of leading criminologists and covered many novel topics related to new and innovative cirminological research.

Dr Treiber spoke about issues relating to the development and continuation of persistent offending and highlighted limitations in existing criminological theories which the Situational Action Theory is being developed to overcome.

To view the conference programme, click here.

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SCoPiC Conferences

The ESRC Priority Network for the Study of the Social Contexts of Pathways in Crime (SCoPiC) hosted four major conferences in Cambridge from 2004-2007. PADS+ was one of four UK research sites which formed this network, and PADS+ Principal Investigator Per-Olof Wikström was also the Network Director. Papers relevant to PADS+ theory, methodology, research and findings were presented at these conferences.

For more on SCoPiC and the SCoPiC conferences, please see the SCoPiC website:
http://www.scopic.ac.uk/

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